Tag Archives: Education

UNCEN students organisation condemns the education situation in Papua

 

JUBI, 20 July, 2012

The Executive Board of the Cenderawasih University students organisation, UNCEN BEM, believes that the decline in education in Papua is evidence of the failure of the Indonesian government, in particular its Education Service.

BEM has called on the provincial administration to pay serious attention to this issue. It believes that manipulations have conceal the failings of the administration.

Nason Ngelia, the organisation’s head of public relations, said: ‘All the top-level personnel  in the education sector throughout Papua should be sacked.’

He went on to say that in kampungs everywhere, the teachers can’t be bothered to do any teaching.  They even allow students who have not reached the right standard to pass the grade. ‘Most government employees  do nothing all day but they still receive their salaries. They don’t do any teaching but keep busy organising projects,’ said Leo Himan, a member of Uncen BEM.

‘We have no confidence in the people working in the education service at the SMPTN unit  at Uncen. There are two problems that we cannot accept. The national testing is not appropriate for Papuans because the education system here is different from that in the rest of Indonesia. The education system here needs to be overhauled,’ said Yoan Alfredo Wambitman, chairman of  the BEM branch at the Faculty of Technology.

In its press release, Uncen BEM appended  the results of the Survey of Political and Economic Risk Consultants (PERC) which states that the quality of education in Indonesia is inferior to education elsewhere in Asia and is at the bottom of the list of the twelve countries in Asia; it is even worse that Vietnam. ‘This  relates to education in Java.  If the situation in Java is that bad, how much worse it is in other places,’ said Nason.

Recently, the Jayapura branch of the Alliance of Independent Journalists published the results of a two-week research project in eight districts in Papua. The heading of the section on education is ‘It’s the same old song which everyone keeps singing’. So who is to blame?’

BEM called on the candidate in the election for governor of Papua to give top priority to the question of education in this the land of Cenderawasih..

[Translated by TAPOL]

 

90% of children in Kamoro leave school before completing their education

JUBI, 8 September, 2011

It is estimated that around 90 percent of children from the Kamoro ethnic group fail to continue their education after completing primary school.   There are many reasons for this.

‘Many Kamoro children dont attend primary school and this affects the number who go on to further education as a result of selection and the minimum standards attained by the children,’ said a local official.

This also reflects the situation of the primary school in Mapar, in the regency of Central Mimika where most of the children who attend primary schools fail to continue to the lower secondary schools. The main problem is where the children live.

‘We do everything we can to motivate them and accompany them but for the
parents the main problem is that they cannot find anywhere to live in Timika. And in those cases where children do attend a school in the town, many of them returned home to their kampungs after only two months for a variety of reasons, primarily because of the cost of living in the town.’

Actually, there are indeed many opportunities for Kamoro children in Timika. Freeport Indonesia has built several hostels for primary and secondary school children but there are hardly any Kamoro children living in these hostels.

One secondary school teacher said: ‘There is the problem of looking after the children and the limited capacity available for pupils coming from the Kamar primary school. We very much hope that the education service will appreciate this problem and find a way out as soon as possible, so that these children can grow up to be masters in own land.’

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A number of teachers in the East Mimika district have complained about the lack of facilities for education at primary and secondary schools many of which have nothing in the way of books or writing equipment.

Veronica Lasol, a primary school teacher at the Mapar primary school, complained that the government, in particular the education and cultural service, pay no attention to all this.

‘We have been suffering from a lack of facilities for a long time, and have spoken about this with the media as well, hoping to draw the attention of the government to the problem of paying attention to education facilities for children living in the kampungs,’ she told Jubi.

‘In our district, almost all the schools are functioning without decent facilities and end up teaching the chidren anything they can mange to do so as to ensure that they can complete their primary school education,’ said Agustinus Maniawasi, a primary school teacher at the YPPK primary school in Pronggo, Mimika district.

Similar complaints were made by Denisius Faruan, a primary school teacher at a school in Timika. He said that there is a need for facilities to support the education of the children. If the teachers were to get the necessary training, the complaints would decline. ‘It is all a matter of giving proper attention to the schools that now exist.’