Tag Archives: criminalisation of peaceful dissent.

Investigation report: December 1 Nabire beatings and arrests of Papuans by army and police

By JPIC-GKI Nabire* with additional reporting from West Papua Media

February 2, 2016

apologies for the delay in publication due to verification and translation delays

On December 1, 2015 the indigenous Papuan community in Nabire   intended to hold worship to commemorate the December 1 Day of Papuan Independence at the community park of Oyehe,  Nabire. However organisers were unaware their worship service in the park had been prohibited by Indonesian Police as an illegal gathering  A joint Army and Police force dispersed the gathering with force, severely beating civilians, and then took arrested civilians to  the Police Headquarters in Nabire.

Chronology
Every 1st of December in Nabire,  a Christian worship service is held to commemorate the anniversary of thwarted Papuan independence, but it goes ahead without raising the banned Morning Star Papuan independence flag.  For the 2015 commemoration, the Papuan Community in Nabire announced and sought permission from the Kapolres (District Police Chief) to hold a Worship service at Oyehe Garden, Nabire, however the  Kapolres disallowed it from going ahead. Organisers cancelled the event, but many people didn’t find out about the cancellation, so they came anyway to the venue

The joint Army-Police force blockaded the garden entrance, so that the community could not access the venue, however more civilians arrived and stood outside the blockade.

Leader of the worship group, Zet Giay, attempted to come to the garden to explain to the gathered people that the Worship had been cancelled, however at 10:30 am Security forces ordered the dispersal of the gathered crowd.  This occurred without any negotiation with Zet Giay,  and so the joint Army/Police task force severely beat, attacked and arrested Zet Giay,  Mikhael Zonggenu, Mirna Hanebora and another 29 Papuans, with rifle butts and pistols, according to witnesses and victims  On the truck, Mikhael Zonggenaw was beaten by a police officer severely with a rifle butt.  All 32 people who were then taken to the Nabire Police HQ sustained injuries from the security force beatings.

The Papuans that were arrested on December 1st 2015, around 10:30 am in Oyehe, Nabire are;

1. Mikhael Zonggenau, 45, Civil Servant , injuries to Nose & Mouth;
2. Zeth Giay, 42, Civil Servant , beaten on head with wooden pole;
3. Pius Gobai  19 years old, Student;
4. Yosep Giay, 18 years old , Youth;
5. Hendrikus Yeimo, 18 years old , Youth;
6. Naftali Gobai, 19 years old, Youth;
7. Yanuarius Pekei, 19 years old, Youth;
8. Anton Kadepa, 18 Years old, Student;
9. Martinus Youw, 19 Years old, Student;
10. Marthinus Adii 23 Years old, Academic;
11. Peni Kayame, 18 Years  Old, Student;
12. Sely Ogetai,  26 Years old, Academic;
13. Derika Keiya, 27  Years old, Academic;
14. Samuel Kotouki, 23  Years Old, Student;
15. Agus Auwe, 22 Years Old, Youth;
16. Yus Degei, 24  Years Old , Student;
17. Angkian Douw, 23 Years Old, Student;
18. Yulibert Pigome, 16 Years old, Student;
19. Neles Waine, 15 Years old, Student;
20. Mesak Wakey, 26 Years old, Youth;
21. Bernard Belau,  31 Years old, Civil Servant;
22. Habel Douw,  56 Years old, Civil Servant;
23. Lince Waine,  22 Years Old, Student;
24. Willem Ikomou,  24  Years Old, Student;
25. Mina Hanebora, 33  Years old, House wife;
26. Nelius Pigai,  26 Years  old, Academic;
27. Melkias Douw,  16 Years old, Student;
With 5 unknown name victims. Total of the victims are 32.

Top: Mikhael Zonggenaw's Upper lip was beaten by the Police. Bottom: Martinus Adii, Lower lip was beaten by the Police
Top: Mikhael Zonggenaw’s Upper lip was beaten by the Police.
Bottom: Martinus Adii, Lower lip was beaten by the Police
Picture of 32 Papuans that was arrested by the Police in Nabire, Papua. The picture was taken after they were released from Nabire District Police office. When they were arrested they were not allowed to take pictures. Source : JPIC KINGMI Nabire.
Picture of 32 Papuans that was arrested by the Police in Nabire, Papua. The picture was taken after they were released from Nabire District Police office. When they were arrested they were not allowed to take pictures. Source : JPIC KINGMI Nabire.

 

*Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPIC) Desk (Keadilan, Perdamaian dan Keutuhan Ciptaan (KPKC) Bidang), Evangelical Christian Church in Papua (Gereja Kristen Injili di Tanah Papua (GKI))

Final Investigation into Dec 1 Wanampompi Yapen flagraising payback shootings, beatings and torture incidents (Warning: graphic images)

Investigation Report

by JPIC* Nabire, with additional reporting from West Papua Media

January 21, 2016

Apologies for the delay in publication due to translation and verification requirements

This report contains graphic images of human rights abuses in context and with actionable data

This report is part of the investigations carried out by the “Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Desk” of the Evangelical Christian Church in Papua (Gereja Kristen Injili di Tanah Papua (GKI), into the shootings in the Yapen Island village of Wanampompi on December 1, 2015, and also sever beatings on indigenous Papuan people of the Oyehe tribe near Nabire.  The Nabire report will be published shortly.

A. Shootings in the Village of Wanampompi – Yapen, December 1, 2015

On December 1, 2015, between 03: 00 AM and  07: 30, Erick Manitori with his friends held prayers and raised the banned independence Morning Star flag in front of his own house in Wanampompi Village, Serui, Yapen.   After the flag-raising ceremony Erik Manitori and his friends then rested at his house.

 

Around 8 am, a joint taskforce of Army and Police came to Erik and friend at his house, and executed by gunfire four people without warning.  Erik Manitori, Yonas Manitori, Darius Andiribi, and Julian Robaha all died instantly and 8 others suffered gunshot wounds.

Chronology

The  joint military-police taskforce came to Erik’s house, using two Estrada cars, one Avanza car, and one Dalmas Riot Police truck. The Joint force had stopped near the street and shouted to Eric to meet with them.  Erik and some of his friends came up to meet the joint force, but within 15-20 distance from the main street,  about 50 meters from the flagpole, Erik and his friends were shot without warning by the combined forces.

Two people were shot dead on the spot, namely, Yonas Manitori ( The Younger brother of Erik Manitori) and Darius Andiribi.  Erik Manitori and Yulianus Robaha were shot in the legs and then dragged into the police truck, whereupon they were taken to the Serui Regional General Hospital ER ( Emeregency Room). On the way to the hospital, the two men were tortured to death. Erik Manitori’s belly was cut open, and with a bayonet he was disembowelled, and his hands and feet were also broken. The two men were unable to be saved at Serui Hospital’s emergency room, and died soon after arrival.

This incident occurred with all victims being unarmed.

Eight other villagers were seriously injured by gunshot, beating and torture, but the Wanampompi villagers managed to helped the victims back to the village and were evacuated to the Randawaya Serui general hospital by civilian ambulance and truck.
The victim’s condition improved after they were evacuated off the Island to General Hospital Biak. One of the victims, Toni Runaweri, still has a bullet lodged in his skull, and is awaiting transfer for a specialist operation by surgeons in Makassar.

List of Victims

  1. Erik Manitori, Died (was tortured, disembowelled and shot);
  2. Yonas  Manitori, Died (Gunshot);
  3. Darius Andiribi, Died (Gunshot);
  4. Yulianus Robaha, Died (Shot in leg, then tortured);
  5. Toni Runaweri, Injured, Gunshot Wound, bullet passed through head and mouth;
  6. Paulinus Warrimuri, Injured, Gunshot wound in Ribs;
  7. Zakarias Torobi, Injured,  Gunshot Wound, left Calf;
  8. Daud Ayomi, Injured, Gunshot Wound on left shoulder;
  9. Filemon Ayomi, Injured, wounds,  right hand and left calf;
  10. Yance Manitori, Injured,  Wounds on Knee, left and right ankle;
  11. Alius Karimati, Injured,  Wound on right palm;
  12. Agus Manitori, Injured, Wound on left hand and left thigh, gunshot to left and right calves.

All of the 8 victims received medical treatment in the public hospital RSUD Biak, and at village
1. Paulinus Warirowai Desember 1st 2015Paulinus Warirowai Shot on his Rib

2. English Desember 1st 2015 2 and 3 Top: 2. Zakarias Torobi Wound on his left calf

Bottom 3. Daud  Ayomi Wound on his left shoulder

Top, 4. Filemon Ayomi Wound on right hand and left calfEnglish Desember 1st 2015 4 and 5

Bottom, 5.  Toni Runaweri, Gunshot Wound through mouth; X-Ray of wound in skull

Top, 6. Yance Manitori, Wound on knee, right and left ankleyance group 678 English Desember 1st 2015

7.  (middle) Alius Karimati, Wound on right calf of hand

8.  (Bottom) Agus Manitori gunshot wound on left hand and left thigh, left calf and  right calf

9. (top) Erik Manitori  Died, tortured and gunshot wounds, his stomach was torn and disembowelled with  bayonet.erick manitori English Desember 1st 2015

10. (bottom) Yulianus Robaha   Died, Tortured and Gunshot

West Papuans Testify: Excerpt from “Merdeka and the Morning Star: Civil Resistance in West Papua”

West Papuans Testify

Book Excerpt from “Merdeka and the Morning Star: Civil Resistance in West Papua”

We have come to testify. There is much that we want the world to know.

We want you to travel with us to the remote places of Papua—Wamena, Paniai, the Jayawijaya Highlands, the Star Mountains, Mindiptana, Timika, Arso, Mamberamo, Biak, Merauke, Asmat and many other places. We want you to hear stories of suffering from the mouths of ordinary people. Our memories are clear and sharp.

‘In this river our father was murdered’

‘On that mountain slope there used to be villages. They were destroyed by the military’

‘On that open field, our old men were forced to burn their koteka [penis sheaths] because they were considered primitive’

‘In the past that mountain was ours, now people have destroyed our mother’

We want you to travel with us to the sites of the massacres. We want to testify about the killings and the beatings with rifles.

We want to testify about the people who were disappeared, those who were imprisoned and those who were tortured.

There have been many forms of torture – the burning, the stabbing of the genitals, the rape of women.

These are some of the injustices that we want the world to know.

On some days bombs have fallen like rain. We have been up against Hercules aircraft and helicopters and boats. They had overwhelming power.

And after the massacres or murders, the injustices always continue.

Rather than acknowledge the truth, they tell lies.

The perpetrators are promoted not punished, while the victims are dragged into court.

Some of us have spent years in prison. One of us was jailed for 15 years simply for raising our Morning Star flag.

Over years we have faced one injustice after another and then another.
There has been violation after violation since 1963. Entire villages have been destroyed. And Papuan people have been turned against other Papuans.

Injustices continue to this day. Today we face human rights violations, economic injustice, and every week thousands more migrants come in white ships and planes. We are becoming a minority in our land.

Those who resist face continuing discrimination. We are excluded from employment, education and health care. And for women, it has been worse.
They suffered the rapes and assaults and then even more. They were shamed by their own families and often marriages broke apart. These are forms of double injustice and women’s suffering that no one should ever have to face.

These are just some of the injustices that we are testifying to today.
We want the world to know about this.

We also want to testify to the effects of these injustices

Some of our bodies bear the scars.

And so do our souls. We will never forget the sound of the killings.
Some of us still feel the fear. For those who fled we don’t know if we will be safe when we return.

Other survivors have been left with physical disabilities and troubles in the mind.

The rapes brought shame – so much shame that some women did not seek medical help.

And sometimes survivors may feel guilty for being alive. The killings can make us doubt that we have a right to live.

There have been effects for children too. Fear came to the children who did not go to school for months.

When the foreigners have taken our land, cut down our forests and destroyed our rivers, this destruction affects us too. The loss of our sacred places has brought sickness to our people.

And sometimes we feel like we are slaves in our own land. Some of us have to struggle everyday just to feed our families and send our children to school.

But there is more that we want you to know.

We want you to know our testimonies of remembrance.

We are survivors and also witnesses. We have always remembered those who were killed. We will remember them until we die.

There are many ways that we do this.

We have cultural ways of joining in memory and in prayer. We place stones or wreaths of flowers. And there are traditional songs that we use to connect us with those who have died and with the ancestors. These are songs we can sing to those who have passed. We do this in a quiet place, a garden, a beach.

Or we remember through making statues of our loved ones, or photos, or lighting candles. We commune with our ancestors.

But we never forget them. They are with us. Those of us who are still alive have a responsibility to keep progressing the struggle. I have dreams of those who were killed in the jungle. They come to me in my dreams and they encourage me to keep going. I dreamt of them just last week. I listen to their voices.

If they knew that we were meeting together now, if they knew that we were gathering this testimony, they would be very happy. This would mean something to them.

They have gone over there to another world. We will always remember them.

We also want you to know the stories of our resistance, action and rescue

Our people have a long, long history of resistance. We Papuans have been resisting outsiders for centuries. Back to the 1850s, the Dutch who were seeking to protect their spice trade, faced more than 40 Papuan rebellions – both violent and nonviolent. Diverse tribes came together to resist. Angganeta Menufandu, a Konor (indigenous prophet) from Biak Island, led a mass defiance of government and mission bans on wor (ritual singing and dancing) and urged her followers not to pay taxes and to withhold labor. When the Japanese invaded, towards the end of World War Two, they were initially welcomed but, after acts of cruelty, the movement for a free and independent West Papua began again. The killings and massacres began in these times. And our resistance continued.

Our struggle for freedom continued after WWII when the US drove the Japanese out of West Papua at the cost of thousands of lives. And since
1963 we have resisted Indonesian government rule.

We remember our long history of resistance. This history raises us up.
We carry it on.

Many of us have formed organisations of action. We come together for survivors of human rights abuses, for women, for people all over Papua.
We form resistance groups. We are students, young people, older people, women, men, religious leaders and traditional leaders. We take action on behalf of those who are living and those who are no longer alive.

Some of us, who witnessed massacres, were involved in acts of rescue on the days when bullets were raining down, and when the sky was on the fire. After the Biak Massacre our family gave shelter to two men who were fleeing for their lives. My father gave them his clothes. He sat my sisters on their laps. We sat down quietly and we opened all the doors and all the windows. When the soldiers came in with all their weaponry, we stood there shaking. As they held their guns at us, and asked us if we were hiding anyone, we said no. We were all shaking, my father, my sisters, myself, but we survived, and the two men survived too. For four days they stayed with us. We had almost no food but my mother found a way to feed us. We are survivors, rescuers and resistors.

Right across Papua, and for so many years, we have continued to resist, to rescue and to raise the Morning Star. When we cannot fly our flag we have painted it on our bodies, stitched it into noken string bags. When one of us was imprisoned for 15 years for raising our flag, he was offered amnesty if he apologised, but he refused. ‘Why should I say sorry? I have done nothing wrong. It is the Indonesian state who has to say sorry. And not just to me but to all the Papuan people. They have to return our sovereignty.’

And even though it is risky for us there are many times we have come out on to the streets in our thousands, even in our tens of thousands, to demand freedom.

These are just some of our stories of resistance. There are stories of resistance all over Papua.

We want you to know that building unity is not easy – but we are doing it

The Indonesian government and corporations use many methods to divide us. To turn Papuans against Papuans. If some people raise their voice, the company will come – or the government will come – and say, ‘Hey come into the office, let’s talk.’ They then give that person money, or a scholarship, or a good job. These are some of the ways our opponent uses to break our resistance.

But we keep taking steps to come together. There is a long history to this. When the Amungme have a problem we build a traditional house. In this house – this Tongoi – people come, sit down and talk. We invite every leader and chief from every village. People come together in one mind. When people then go out of the Tongoi they are going to bring a change. These are traditional ways of calling up assistance. In our culture, no one can stand up by themselves. Everyone needs everyone.

So we keep taking steps to come together. We have now formed the United Liberation Movement for West Papua. Inside this United Movement are the National Federal Republic of West Papua (NFRWP), the West Papua National Coalition of Liberation (WPNCL), National Committee for West Papua (KNPB), National Parliament for West Papua (PNWP) and other non-affiliated groups. We are strengthening our struggle and as we do so more and more people join us. People in other Pacific nations are raising their voices.

Our resistance is like a mat or noken – many strands woven together to become one.

Our resistance is like a spear, sharp and dangerous.

Our resistance is like a drum that speaks with the voices of the ancestors.

We want you to know about Papuan skills in survival

Despite all the injustices we have faced, we are survivors and we have many skills. We are wise about when to speak, when to stay quiet, and when to sing our songs. Some of these songs were written in prison for the future of West Papua. Some of our singers have been arrested and murdered. But we continue to sing freedom.

We also have our dances. We wear our traditional dress, and dance traditional Papuan dances. Our Papuan culture helps us to love and care for one another. When we live inside our culture we are free.

We have prayer, faith in Jesus Christ, and God as our witness.

And we have each other. We are among friends and we want to acknowledge all those who have stood with us.

There are other Papuan survival skills too.

Like mothers’ skills of endurance. Mothers who sell fruit and vegetables to feed their families and send their children to school display their produce on hessian mats by the side of the road. Rain, hail, sun and dust they sit. They survive.

Some of us travelled by canoe with 43 others all the way to Australia to seek another life. Years later, some of us sailed back to West Papua with the Freedom Flotilla. The West Papuans, Aboriginal elders and other Australian supporters on board the Flotilla carried a message of peace and solidarity, and reignited ancient connections.

And we have skills in humour, in jokes and in laughter. Even in the hardest times, we pray, we sing, we dance, and somehow we find a way to laugh.

We want you to know about our hopes and our dreams

We carry a big hope together … a free West Papua. We have held onto this hope for many, many years.

As we lift up these injustices to the light, then all the other cases will also be lifted up.

And we carry a hope for justice – international justice, western justice, West Papuan justice, spiritual justice.

That is why we are testifying today.

We are sharing with you testimonies of injustice.

We are speaking about the effects of these injustices.

We are sharing testimonies of remembrance.

We are sharing stories of resistance, action and rescue.

We are sharing the ways we build unity.

We are sharing our Papuan survival skills.

And we are testifying to our hopes and to our dreams.

What we are testifying here has been an open secret. We have always known this, God has always known this, but now you will know it too.

This means that now you are also witnesses.

So these stories and our hopes will now also be carried by you.

Thank you.

..

Biodata: Jason MacLeod is an organiser, researcher and educator. He is the author of the just-published book ‘Merdeka and the Morning Star: civil resistance in West Papua’.
 This testimony was written in collaboration with Mama Tineke and Daniel Rayer, two West Papuan activists who survived the Biak Massacre, and David Denborough from the Dulwich Centre. It contains the voices of many of the people of West Papua Jason has collaborated with and is in part based on a similar testimony developed for the Biak Massacre Citizens Tribunal.

The Release of Filep Karma Upholds the Principle of Human Rights in Papua, yet others remain behind bars

Statement by Yan Christian Warinussy, Executive Director of the LP3BH

20 November 2015

On behalf of the Institute of Research, Analysis and Development of Legal Aid – Manokwari [LP3BH], I welcome the release of one of the pro-Papua Merdeka political prisoners, Filep Karma on 19 November 2015.

Bapak [Father] Filep Karma is now a former political prisoner. He was arrested on 1 December 2004 and was sentenced to fifteen years at his trial at the District Court of Jayapura on 26 May, 2005.  Karma was charged for an action under Article 106 and Article 110 of the Criminal Code [KUHP].

He has spent more than ten years in prison for activities that he was involved in in accordance with the principles of the freedom of
expression and the freedom of assembly.  On that occasion, he made a speech and raised the Morning Star Flag on 1 December 2004.  He refrained from any actions of violence nor was he armed with any weapons.

Despite all that, he was one of a number of people who were arrested, imprisoned and charged in a Court of Law by a State that simply ignored his basic rights as a free citizen, entitled to protection under Article 28 of the 1945 Constitution of Indonesia.

During his imprisonment, he was treated in ways that are in violation of humanitarianism and basic human rights that are universally recognised.

The only thing he was doing was to give expression to his opinions that are in conflict with the views of the State.  His actions on that
occasion did not in any way destabilise anything politically or disrupt law and order.

The LP3BH calls on the Government of Indonesia and the Head of State, President Ir H. Joko Widodo to take the opportunity of release
of Filip Karma to launching a series of actions to release all the political prisoners, including those who have been tried (napol), who
are serving sentences in a number of prisons in towns and cities throughout the Land of West Papua.

Take for example the cases of three activists of the KNPB [National Committee of West Papua], Alexander Nekenem, Maikel Aso aka
Yoram Magai and Narko Murib aka Nopinus Humawak who were tried in the District Court in Manokwari.  They too, like Filep Karma, were accused of inciting other people to get involved in activities violating the law and charged under Article 160 of the KUHP, together with Article 55 of the Criminal Code.

At a subsequent hearing in their trial, on 19 November, the Prosecutor called for the three men to be sentenced to two years each, with deduction for the time already spent in prison.

These charges were extremely severe for the three accused who had refrained from perpetrating any acts of violence nor did they incite others to engage in any unlawful activities.  Nothing that they did resulted in anyone else being killed or injured or cause any material
damage on that day, 20 May, 2015 in Amban-Manokwari, Province of West Papua.

Peace!

[Translated by Carmel Budiardjo, Recipent of the Right Livelihod Award, 1995]

Warinussy: Continued Brimob police Detention of Alexander Nekenem is Rights Violation

Statement by Yan Christian Warinussy, Executive Director of LP3BH

10 November 2015

Speaking on behalf of the LP3BH – Manokwari [Institute of Research,
Analysis and Development of Legal Aid] as well as the Co-ordinator of
the defence team of Alexander Nekenem and his colleagues, it is my
opinion that the Prosecutor, Syahrun SH from the Prosecutor’s Office
in Manokwari has violated the basic human rights of one of my clients.

A statement issued by the Court stated that the length of
detention of my clients should be prolonged for sixty days, from 30
September till 28 November 2015.

A copy of this decision was sent to the Director of the Prison in
Manokwari. But where should these extra days be spent, in which
prison?

Why is it that that Alexander Nekenem and his colleagues continue
to be held in custody at the Brimob Command Centre. Is this the prison
where Alexander Nekenem and his colleagues are to spend the rest of
their detention?

Furthermore, it is clear that the Prosecutor in this case has
violated the rights one of the colleagues of Alexander Nekemen. This
is all the more so in view of the fact that this colleague, Narko
Murib, was taken ill during a hearing in the case and should therefore
have been allowed to be absent from the Court and held in a custodial
cell at the State Prison in Manokwari.

The Chairman of the Panel of Judges instructed the Prosecutor to
take the afore-mentioned prisoner for examination and given whatever
medical treatment he required.

However, regrettably, the Prosecutor’s Office did not act to
ensure that Narko Murib was taken for a medical check-up. All that
happened was that his blood pressure was checked and he was given
some tablets to bring his temperature down.

As a result, Narko Murib was unable to attend the court hearing
on Tuesday, 10 November because he was still unwell.

Peace.

Yan Christian Warinussy is also the Recipient of the John Humphrey Freedom Award 2015 in Canada, Human Rights Defender in the Land of Papua, and
Member of the Steering Commission of Foker LSM for the Land of Papua.

Translated by Carmel Budiardjo, Recipient of the Right Livelihood Award, 1995.