Tag Archives: Impunity

Indonesian Air Force Members Torture Amsal Marandof and Ida Marandof at the Arafat Village, Samofa District, Biak

Urgent Action / Verified Field Report

by JPIC, GKI-TP Synod*

November 23, 2015

On June 5th, 2015, 14:20hours, a member of the Air Force heavily maltreated Amsal Marandof (22 Years old), leading to an injury above his right eyebrow.  As Amsal’s elder sister named Ida Marandof (Around 26) wanted to intervene in the beating to help her brother she was severely beaten on the chest by one Air Force member causing the victim to loose consciousness.

Biodata of Victims:
Name : Amsal Marandof
Age : 22 Years
Date/Place of Birth : Biak, 4 April 1994
Occupation : private sector
Gender : Male
Status : Single

Name : Ida Marandof
Age : +/- 26 years
Date/Place of Birth : –
Occupation : private sector
Gender : Female
Status : Married

Case Narrative


On Wednesday June 5, 2015, around 14:20 pm, local Biak man Amsal Marandof went to his brother’s grave on the left side of the “Papan Kuning” road.  Amsal was bringing a machete with him to cut the grass around the grave. When Amsal arrived there he saw 2 Army Air Force soldiers approximately 200 meters ahead of him, following activities on a piece of land that had previously led to a conflict between Amsal’s family and the Army Air Force. For that reason Amsal walked
over to them and intended to asked what they were doing at the location.
As The Victim approached 2 air force members, one security force member panicked and stepped backwards and fell down. Thereupon the Air Force member became angry and kicked Amsal into the face. The kick caused a bleeding injury above the victim’s right eyebrow.

The air force member’s aggressive behaviour made Amsal angry, so he fought back using the machete with the intention strike the Air Force member’s head and hit his helmet. Subsequently,  Amsal panicked and retreated.  After several minutes,  many Air Force members came running out of their headquarters to chase after Amsal.  One air force member ran towards him and pointed his gun at the Amsal.  Other Air Force members threw wooden sticks and rocks at him shouting “You are an OPM member” (Papua Freedom Movement).

Thereupon the victim sought rescue at Arafat work shop. Around 50 Air Force members caught him in front of the workshop, where they kicked and punched Amsal.

When the victims’ elder sister named Ida Marandof (26) received information about the incident she directly went to the location to help her brother, by stopping the security forces (from beating him).  As Ida Marandof intervened in the beating one of the Army Air Force hit her on the chest, causing the victim to lose consciousness, so Ida was immediately brought to the Air Force Base Hospital at Singamangaraja Street, Biak City.  Amsal Marandof victim was brought to Biak
District Police Office where he was taken into custody.
Ida received medical treatment and was supplied with oxygen. As she became conscious, a member of the Army Air Force questioned Ida, but she refused to answer.

After that the Air Force member gave Ida Marandof IDR100.000 (less than US$10) as transport cost and said “This problem ends here ya”. Subsequently Ida left the hospital, still feeling pain in her stomach.

Around 15.15 local Papuan time, local residents became angry and blocked the “Papan Kuning” road in front of the grave of Amsal and Ida Marandof’s brother.  The demonstrators cut the trees and broke some bottles in the middle of the road which caused a traffic jam.  Around 17:00 the road block was reopened by the community members and police.
Pictures of Amsal and Ida Marandof revealing injuries caused by members of the Indonesian Airforce (JPIC/WPM)

Wound above Amsal Marandof's right eye
Wound above Amsal Marandof’s right eye
Amsal's body is covered with bruises caused by Airforce military members
Amsal’s body is covered with bruises caused by Airforce military members
Ida Marandof during the interview
Ida Marandof during the interview


*Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPIC) Desk of the
Gereja Kristen Injili di Tanah Papua (GKI – Evangelical Christian Church in Papua)

Jokowi Evades Questions on Paniai Shootings: West Papua Daily

by Victor Mambor at Tabloid Jubi
May 11, 2015

Peoples in Paniai evacuated body of victim - Suplied

Jayapura, Jubi – President Joko Widodo evaded questions about a lack of progress in the investigation into the December 8 shootings that killed four students in Enarotali, Paniai.

“I’ll answer it later after this (granting pardons to five political prisoners),” he said when a Jubi reporter asked him about the Paniai case’s settlement in the question-and-answer session during a ceremony granting pardon to five Papuan political prisoners at Abepura prison in Jayapura on Saturday (9/5/2015).

After the ceremony, Jubi asked him the same question in a private interview but Jokowi said repeatedly: ” I’ll give the answer later. I couldn’t answer it now. Because if I answer it now it could eclipse the granting of pardon issue.”

After the plenary session held on 7 – 8 April 2015, the Indonesian National Human Right Commission announced receiving the investigation report from the Paniai Investigation Team.

“We received the report from the Paniai Team and endorsed it towards the Law No.26/2000, that the team must complete the report and its requirement (case matrix and legal studies),” Dr. Meneger Nasution, the Chairman of Paniai Case Team said before dozens of Papuan students and supporters after the plenary.

Further Nasution who accompanied by other Human Rights Commissionaire Natalius Pigay, said the case matrix and legal studies would be presented in the plenary session in May 2015. “One month is required because the report must be compiled with legal studies and case matrix which should be met with the international legal instrument,” Nasution added. But up to now, there is no further decision about the case by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission. (Victor Mambor/rom)

Jubi: Marine working for PT Dongin Prabhawa shoots local man in Mappi

From our partners at Tabloid Jubi (Translated by awasMifee)

February 10, 2015

Talema Waitipo, a 19-year old resident of the Maam area, Bade District,
Mappi Regency, is currently in a weak condition as he lies in a bed at the Naval hospital in Merauke.  He is believed to be the victim of shooting by an (Indonesian Navy) Marine officer, who was providing security for PT
Dongin Prabhawa’s oil palm plantation.

He was shot in the left thigh, the bullet exiting at the back of his leg, and also in his chest. Another man, Yance Doga, is also believed to have a been wounded in the hand by a bayonet.  Both are currently undergoing treatment.

A family member of the victim, Bernardus Wuka, related that although he had not been present when the incident took place, several local
residents had told him that Talema had been shot by a member of the
marine corps who was guarding PT Dongin Prabhawa’s operational area. He also believed Yance had been stabbed by a member of the armed forces.

He went on to explain that the alleged shooting had taken place on the
8th February 2015 at around 03.00 local time. Both victims were brought
to PT Dongin Prabhawa’s clinic in Bade District, but as the equipment
there was insufficient to treat their injuries, they were brought to
Merauke to be treated in the Naval hospital.

“Actually the condition of both Talema and Yance is gradually improving.
They will both need treatment for several days more, especially Talema
who was shot. He is still not able to communicate properly because of
the injury he has suffered”, said Wuka.

Jubi has also received information that on 7th February 2015, there was
a birthday party which was followed up by dancing and drinking strong
alcohol. That party continued to the next morning. With several people
under the influence of alcohol there was some friction which ended up in squabbles between the people present.

A few moments later, naval marine officers arrived on the scene, tried
to break up the fight, and fired warning shots into the air. It seems that those shots did not disperse the people, who instead attacked (the Marines) back.

Several hours later, the source continued, there was a search and the
two injured men were discovered. At that moment they were rushed to the company’s clinic to help them.  The victims’ families were feeling
unsatisfied and started damaging some of the clinic’s facilities.

Separately, the Commandant of the Merauke Naval Base, Brigadier General Buyung Lalana, made a statement to the press that the initial trigger for the incident was strong alcohol. There had been an event taking place in the Maam area.

Some residents were disturbed by the event because of the drinking, the Naval Commander said, and so combined military and police security forces, including the marines, conducted a patrol. The presence of security personnel was thought to have disturbed and impeded the party.

“There was a group of people under the influence of alcohol, who started making trouble. So one of our members let off some shots into the air. At the beginning they were fighting between themselves”, he said.

He acknowledged that people were injured and had been brought to a
clinic owned by PT Dongin Prabhawa for treatment. “I have received
reports from our personnel that the victim’s wounds were not caused by
gunshots,” he clarified.

Nevertheless, the naval base commander promises to conduct further
investigation. If security personnel have been out of line, action would
be taken in accordance with procedures. On the other hand, if residents
are out of line and want to do something that will disturb the peace of
the majority, that of course would not be tolerated. (Frans L Kobun)

[awasMIFEE note: Obviously further clarification is needed around this
incident, but the indications are of an extremely disproportionate use
of force by military personnel responding to an incident of drunken
brawling. This militaristic approach to local incidents of public
disorder is common in Papua, and is often linked to military or police
mobile brigade employed by plantation companies as security guards. It
is also not the first time that naval personnel stationed in Bade have
violently intervened in local disputes: in February 2014 Blasius
Sumaghai was beaten with rifle butts and hosepipes, leaving him unable
to walk for four days.]

Papuans Behind Bars October 2014: ‘Bloody Yotefa’: police turn a blind eye to violence against indigenous Papuans

From our partners at Papuans Behind Bars, with additional reporting from West Papua Media and JPIC

17 November 2014

At the end of October 2014, there were at least 69 political prisoners in
Papuan gaols.

At least 46 members of the West Papua National Committee (Komite Nasional Papua Barat, KNPB) were arrested in Jayapura and Merauke this month for participating in peaceful demonstrations. The demonstrators were urging the Indonesian government to release two French journalists who faced trial for breaching immigration rules.

In likely reference to the Social Organisations Law (RUU Organisasi Kemasyarakatan, RUU Ormas), police claimed during the mass arrests that the KNPB is an illegal organisation as it is not registered with the Department of National Unity and Politics (Kesatuan Bangsa dan Politik, Kesbangpol) and affiliated symbols or attributes are also therefore illegal. Last June, police conducted a mass arrest in Boven Digoel under the same auspices.  Indonesian human rights group Imparsial challenged the shutting down of peaceful demonstrations in Jayapura and Merauke, stating that freedom of expression in Papua is the worst in Indonesia, particularly when it comes to the treatment of KNPB rallies. The criminalisation of peaceful demonstrations, often under the auspices of the Ormas Law, restricts democratic space and stigmatises Papuan civil society groups.

On 27 October, two French journalists, Thomas Dandois and Valentine
Bourrat, were released after 11 weeks in detention. However, Lanny Jaya
tribal leader Areki Wanimbo, who was arrested alongside the pair, still
faces charges of conspiracy to commit treason. Lawyers from the Democracy Alliance for Papua (Aliansi Demokrasi untuk Papua, ALDP) have stated that the legal process for Wanimbo has been fraught with irregularities and that his case has been handled unprofessionally. Wanimbo faces charges different to those he was first accused of, and unsuitable evidence was used to build a case against him. The decision to impose a two-and-a-half-month prison sentence on the two journalists instead of acquitting them was a harsh blow for the campaign to open access to Papua. As noted by Human Rights Watch researcher Andreas Harsono, foreign journalists face a complex system of applying for visas to Papua, which requires the approval of 18 different government agencies – a process that severely restricts journalistic access. It remains to be seen whether Indonesian president Joko Widodo will make good on his promise of opening access to Papua.

Bloody Yotefa

In our July update we raised concerns regarding an incident which has come to be known as ‘Bloody Yotefa,’ that took place on 2 July at Yotefa market in Abepura. Early reports stated that three Papuan men were killed following a police raid on a gambling den at Yotefa market.  At least four Papuan men from the Central Highlands were tortured and 40 people arrested according to a Report from the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Desk (Keadilan, Perdamaian dan Keutuhan Ciptaan, KPKC) of the Evangelical Christian Church (Gereja Kristen Injili, GKI). Following the raid on the market, police arrested and handed over two Papuans, including a 14-year-old boy, to a mob of non-indigenous Papuans who publicly tortured and beat them while police stood by, later continuing the job themselves at Bhayangkara Police Hospital. While police beatings, torture and killings of indigenous Papuans are not new phenomena, the public involvement of non-indigenous mobs to achieve this is a particular low point.

Bloody Yotefa challenges the government perspective that torture and killings are carried out by a rogue police in isolated cells, showing instead that these arbitrary violations are becoming social events in which the non-indigenous community can participate. This dynamic
perpetuates a culture of fear and domination in which indigenous Papuans are exposed to constant risk of public violence, even in traditionally ‘safe’ spaces such as hospitals and university campuses. Police discrimination and profiling of indigenous Papuans, especially those who come from the Central Highlands, makes them still more vulnerable to public torture, violence and arbitrary arrest.

You can read the full update here:

Papuans Behind Bars team

Papuan students attacked with machetes in Manado, 2 dead, 4 injured: WARNING GRAPHIC


from our partners at MajalahSelangkah.com, with additional reporting by West Papua Media

original report Sunday 19th October 2014,

2 Victim Petius Tabuni after being hacked to death by militias in Manado. Photo supplied

Victim Petius Tabuni after being hacked to death by militias in Manado. Photo supplied (accompanying image too gruesome to display openly, if you must see this click here.)

 Manado, MAJALAH SELANGKAH – a Papuan student, Petius Tabuni, was hacked to death with machetes by unknown assailants, believed to be militia, around 3am local time on Sunday morning(19/10/2014) in Tondano City, Manado, North Sulawesi.

Petius, a student at Manado State Political-technical university,  died on the spot from his extensive and vicious  machete wounds across his back, body, head and face.  Five other Papuans who went to look for him were also attacked and rushed to a hospital nearby, by the same assailants.  The names of the other students and dead boy have not yet been released at time of writing.

“At this point, the  situation in Manado is not very safe. We are all too scared to leave our dormitories,”  a student from Manado told majalahselangkah.com on Sunday.

The incident began as students from Manado University (UNIMA) on Saturday night (18/10/2014) were holding a graduation celebration party at the student dormitory village of Tataaran Patar Minahasa.

The victim was reported to have been intoxicated, and left the party. Around 03:00 am, he telephoned his brother and friends saying he was being attacked.   When 5 of his friends came to the place he had called from, they found him already lying dead.

Before they had time to park their motorbikes, they were attacked with machetes for over twenty minutes by a large group of local Manado people loitering in the darkness nearby. The five were severely injured with machete wounds, with one of the five students, reportedly just out of middle school, died in hospital.

Local sources reported that a large group of Papuan students at Tondano are being forced to barricade themselves and have been stranded in their student boarding houses.   They can not leave even with a rental car, according to local sources, because there is information circulating that the perpetrators are still looking for more Papuan victims.

Manado police have refused to return calls from West Papua Media about the status of the victims and the current security situation for Papuan students in Manado.  (BT/014/MS/WPM)

Additional reporting, Edited and translated by Westpapuamedia

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