Tag Archives: Convention on the Rights of the Child

Papua itu Kita: Dismiss Police officer that committed Sexual Violence to Children in Fak-Fak

By Arnold Belau at SuaraPapua.com

May 10, 2016

Translated by NR for WestPapuaMedia

JAYAPURA, SUARAPAPUA.com. The civil society group of Papua itu Kita in Jakarta has demanded that a police officer who sexually abused children arrested during state repression in Fak-Fak, be fired and prosecuted.

Papuan Rights campaign “Papua itu Kita”, explained that three under-age children were sexually abused by the members of the state security apparatus. On May 2, 2016, large-scale arrests took place in the city of Jayapura. A total approaching 1,744 people were arrested simply for peacefully protesting to support the full membership of the United Liberation Movement for West Papua (ULMWP) in the Melanesian Spearhead Group (MSG).

“It was the largest arrest post-tragedy 65 (the bloody coup the brought former dictator Suharto to power) and became the only largest arrests post-reformasi (the mass movement that removed Suharto in 1998), where democracy has become a choice that should support the freedom of expression and speech,” said Papua itu Kita through a press release on its official website, on 7 May.

It is said, the arrest did not stop in Jayapura, but (continues) until Fakfak. In four waves, the police have arrested 122 people. The arrest of thousands of people not only harm the democracy but also tear up our conscience. Because the three under-age children who were arrested had experienced sexual abuse from the police (fak-fak.com).

” WM (16 years old) his penis squeezed, DB (14 years) and TM (12 years old) were forced to watch pornographic videos and then being forced to masturbate. The act of sexual violence was carried out in the examination room of Fakfak police station,” said Papua itu Kita.

In response, Papua itu Kita, as a movement of solidarity with civil society for humanity and justice for the people of Papua, announced:

first, condemn the acts of sexual violence committed by police against WM (16 years), DB (14 years) and TM (12 years old ).

Secondly, discharge, arrest and prosecuted the perpetrators with a legal process which is transparent and accountable.

Thirdly, the Indonesian Commission of Child Protection (KPAI) should participate in investigating the cases of sexual violence against children in Papua.

Fourthly, the State must establish a comprehensive system and non-discriminatory as a safeguard for children, especially in Papua.

“That sexual violence, particularly against children, cannot be justified for any reason. Especially, if the perpetrator is a police officer. With jargon “to protect, foster and embracing the citizens, they should be able to provide protection and safe space for children,” they wrote.

Meanwhile, Papuan human rights activists in Fak-Fak, Freddy Warpopor, confirmed this media and said the incident was true.

Those who arrested at that time were 98 people. Among them there are 18 children who call themselves the Sons of West Papua also get arrested. One of the children was forced to watch pornographic films named DK (14) and other friends forced to do masturbation by the police officers.

“The Children, the victims, identified the police officer (who forced the victim to watch pornographic films) when we showed the photo. Only the name is not yet known. It is already included in the category of pornography. After asked to watch, they get beaten, slapped and forced to smoke cigarette. They were forced to do a push-up and then slapped. The children were subjected to torture, ” said Warpopor.

ARNOLD BELAU

90% of children in Kamoro leave school before completing their education

JUBI, 8 September, 2011

It is estimated that around 90 percent of children from the Kamoro ethnic group fail to continue their education after completing primary school.   There are many reasons for this.

‘Many Kamoro children dont attend primary school and this affects the number who go on to further education as a result of selection and the minimum standards attained by the children,’ said a local official.

This also reflects the situation of the primary school in Mapar, in the regency of Central Mimika where most of the children who attend primary schools fail to continue to the lower secondary schools. The main problem is where the children live.

‘We do everything we can to motivate them and accompany them but for the
parents the main problem is that they cannot find anywhere to live in Timika. And in those cases where children do attend a school in the town, many of them returned home to their kampungs after only two months for a variety of reasons, primarily because of the cost of living in the town.’

Actually, there are indeed many opportunities for Kamoro children in Timika. Freeport Indonesia has built several hostels for primary and secondary school children but there are hardly any Kamoro children living in these hostels.

One secondary school teacher said: ‘There is the problem of looking after the children and the limited capacity available for pupils coming from the Kamar primary school. We very much hope that the education service will appreciate this problem and find a way out as soon as possible, so that these children can grow up to be masters in own land.’

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A number of teachers in the East Mimika district have complained about the lack of facilities for education at primary and secondary schools many of which have nothing in the way of books or writing equipment.

Veronica Lasol, a primary school teacher at the Mapar primary school, complained that the government, in particular the education and cultural service, pay no attention to all this.

‘We have been suffering from a lack of facilities for a long time, and have spoken about this with the media as well, hoping to draw the attention of the government to the problem of paying attention to education facilities for children living in the kampungs,’ she told Jubi.

‘In our district, almost all the schools are functioning without decent facilities and end up teaching the chidren anything they can mange to do so as to ensure that they can complete their primary school education,’ said Agustinus Maniawasi, a primary school teacher at the YPPK primary school in Pronggo, Mimika district.

Similar complaints were made by Denisius Faruan, a primary school teacher at a school in Timika. He said that there is a need for facilities to support the education of the children. If the teachers were to get the necessary training, the complaints would decline. ‘It is all a matter of giving proper attention to the schools that now exist.’